Andaman Lagoons - Destination Baratang Island (North and Middle Andaman) in Andaman Islands

Limestone Cave

From Baratang Island (Nilambur Jetty) Lime Stone Caves are half and hour boat ride through a wide creek which leads to Nayadera Jetty and further one and half km. walk through tropical forest. Limestone is a sedimentary rock formed at the bottom of the sea. It is formed by the compression over millions of years of the gradual deposits of many ingredients such as marine life, shells, skeletons and corals.

There is a board-walk winding its way through mangroves from the main creek to Nayadera Jetty for a distance of about 240 mtrs. Tourists either may directly reach by boat or walk through the board walk to reach Nayadera jetty. The boat ride that connects the location of these caves with Baratang jetty is magnificent. It passes through a narrow mangrove creek and that is an experience in itself.

Limestone Caves are massive sedimentary limestone formations, some of which are hanging from the top, some growing from the ground. These caves are constantly evolving in shape and size. As you go inside the caves, you can actually see different patterns that are made by limestone.

Mud Volcano

Mud Volcano at Baratang Island is reachable by a short ride from the Nilambur jetty and another 160 meters walk up a rocky path.

A mud volcano is created by natural gases emitted by decaying organic matter underground. As the mud is pushed upwards by the gas, it deposits and hardens above the ground. As more mud oozes out and spills over the edge it grows in size, gradually forming a miniature volcano with rich, creamy mud crater at the top. Andamans is one of the few places in the world where these volcanoes are found and you may thus want to give it a visit.

Baratang Island contains the only known examples of mud volcanoes in India. These mud volcanoes have erupted sporadically, with recent eruptions in 2005 believed to have been associated with the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake. The previous major eruption recorded was on 18 February 2003. The locals call this mud volcano 'Jalki'.

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